Mediterranean Plant Conservation Workshop

This two-day workshop focuses on strengthening networking surrounding, exchanging experiences and mutual learning on the topic of plant conservation in the Mediterranean Basin.

The content will be structured in following topics:

Session 1Integrating wild plants information for site management and conservation.
Session 2Cultural practices for conservation in the Mediterranean region.
Session 3: Community-conserved areas in the future management of biodiversity, land and water in the Mediterranean.
Session 4Networking, building synergies and involving volunteers; and citizen science.

Integrating wild plants information for site management and conservation
Description

This session will explore how to translate plant information (species, populations, habitats, threats…) into concrete plant conservation actions, or even plant conservation planning.

Plant information at site level is often dispersed, unavailable, or out-of-date. In addition, translating existing wild plant information into decision-making is not a straightforward process. This session gathers examples from around the Mediterranean where the results of field survey studies or other plant data may successfully translate into site-based conservation actions.

The session will also  provide space for the elaboration of collaborative proposals, either from scientists, managers, local populations or civil society groups who wish to test innovative collaboration models.

It will explore possible avenues for collaboration between scientists and decision-makers at site level with a view to developing conservation policies and site based actions involving local populations.

In the context of this session, a “site” is defined according to its management scale: it includes not only IPA but also Protected Areas, community managed areas, or other management units.

Stories and cases of coordination between managers, scientists, and communities or local users will be presented.

Chair

Marcos Valderrábano. Centre for Mediterranean Cooperation of IUCN. Marcos.valderrabano@iucn.org; Bertrand de Montmollin bertrand@montmollin.me and Teresa Gil teresa.gil@iucn.org

Cultural practices for conservation in the Mediterranean region
Description

This session will explore the diversity of Cultural Practices of Conservation (CPCs) that benefit plant conservation in the Mediterranean region. Participants will share experiences in documenting, promoting and protecting CPCs in their areas of work.

Local and indigenous communities around the Mediterranean have shaped the landscapes for thousands of years. Many cultural practices and lifestyles that have a positive effect on nature and biodiversity still exist today, but they are by and large threatened. Practices such as mobile pastoralism, traditional agriculture and bioclimatic architecture protect and enhance biodiversity, maintain long-term productivity and sustain livelihoods. Mediterranean ecosystems have co-evolved with people: cultural practices in part are responsible for ecological heterogeneity and biodiversity patterns in this area. However, CPCs are rarely taken into account in conservation actions and planning.

This session will showcase examples of CPCs, as well as experiences of documenting and supporting CPCs, from around the Mediterranean region. In tandem with the subsequent session on Friday 28th October, discussions in this session will form the basis for the development of an initial roadmap for CPCs protection and inclusion in conservation action and planning at the regional level.

This session will explore the potential of CPCs for enhancing plant conservation in the Mediterranean and help create synergies between participants who will interact and share experiences. A combination of presentations by participants and hands-on exercises will allow the group to explore in depth the diversity of experiences and possibilities for supporting and strengthening CPCs in the region.

This session will be chaired by Liza Zogib, member of the Mediterranean Consortium for Nature and Culture and Irene Teixidor Toneu from University of Reading.

Chair

Global Diversity Foundation: Irene Teixidor Toneu i.teixidor-toneu@reading.ac.uk and Gary Martin gary@global-diversity.org

Community-conserved areas in the future management of biodiversity, land and water in the Mediterranean
Description

Indigenous Peoples’ and Community Conserved Territories and Areas (ICCAs) are key landscape level practices for conservation. ICCAs ensure traditional livelihoods of rural populations whilst conserving biocultural diversity. Examples of ICCAs in the Mediterranean include agdals, which are socially-, spiritually- and culturally-embedded traditional management systems for conserving pasture and other resources that are prevalent in rural areas throughout the Maghreb. However, ICCAs in the Mediterranean region are poorly understood and scientific research on their structure, role, potential and current challenges has only just begun.

Moreover, while CPCs have been discussed and proposed as useful tools for conservation in the conservation and social science literature for almost 3 decades, to date there has been little effective integration of these practices in everyday conservation planning and action, including their formal recognition and acceptance by government agencies. This session will explore the challenges and opportunities for this integration.

In this session we will discuss the role of ICCAs as cultural practices for landscape-level conservation. We will also debate how CPCs should be recognized and integrated in conservation actions and planning whilst respecting communities’ rights to decide upon their knowledge and practices. We will explore the challenges involved in this integration through a hands-on exercise. The workshop will conclude with a collective brainstorming session with a view to developing initial ideas for a Roadmap for integrating CPCs in conservation action and planning at the regional level in the Mediterranean.

This session will be chaired by the Global Diversity Foundation.

Chair

Global Diversity Foundation: Irene Teixidor Toneu i.teixidor-toneu@reading.ac.uk and Gary Martin gary@global-diversity.org

Networking, building synergies and involving volunteers; and citizen science
Description

On-the-ground conservation entails involving local stakeholders and local communities in conservation actions and advocacy. Such a bottom-up approach presents its own challenges and solutions. This session will explore what these challenges are, how they differ within a local context, and what has worked in different areas.

The aim of this session is to share experiences in creating synergies with and engaging local communities in conservation advocacy and conservation actions. This session will explore how civil society groups such as NGOs create collaborations to promote conservation in a local context.

The approach will be to provide a space for sharing of experiences from groups that have engaged in such work for a long time e.g. Plantlife, IPAMed partners. Local stakeholders such as student groups, art groups will also be invited to share their experiences in such collaborations.

Poster communications

Poster will be displayed during all the event.

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